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Customer Questions & Answers for
Nikon Inc. D800

D800, built for today’s multimedia photographer includes a groundbreaking 36.3MP FX-format CMOS sensor, Full HD 1080p video at 30/25/24p with stereo sound, class leading ISO range of 100-6400, expandable to 25,600, 4 fps burst rate and Advanced Scene Recognition System with 91,000-pixel RGB sensor. <img width="1" height="1" alt="" src="http://tr.webantenna.info/_webantenna.png?ga=WABnVM-1&jse=0&cv=USA_lineup" mce_src="http://tr.webantenna.info/_webantenna.png?ga=WABnVM-1&jse=0&cv=USA_lineup">
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Questions & Answers for Nikon Inc. D800

Question

What is the best lens for the nikon d800?

Guys, I need help choosing a lens less that 1200 dollars. It has to be either a wide angle, prime lens, or zoom lens.
Location : Canada
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
asked 2 years, 2 months ago
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The kid
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : Canada
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
on D800
+16points
16out of 16found this question helpful.
8 answers
Answers
answer 1
Nikon 85mm 1,8G. Super sharp.
answered 2 months, 1 week ago
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Anonymous
2 months, 1 week ago
+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
answer 2
if it were me, i would find a prime lens.
and get the best lens you can buy.

this is posted today 11/30/13 at B&H
REFURBISHED
Nikon 105mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Micro - Refurbished by Nikon U.S.A.
SKU: NK10528AFVRR MFR: 2160B
$789.

and kid, i wouldn't steer you wrong. this is a really nice lens.
merry christmas.
Location : New Jersey, USA
Nikon Family: 21+ years
answered 4 months, 3 weeks ago
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jmf
4 months, 3 weeks ago
Location : New Jersey, USA
Nikon Family: 21+ years
+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
answer 3
The first thing you need to do is determine what kinds of subjects and lighting conditions you will be facing before deciding on lenses for any dslr. Nikon has a published list of recommended lenses and DxOMark has done some very comprehensive testing to identify the best lenses in terms of image quality to match up with a D800. I shoot with 6 Nikkor lenses....16-35 f/4 VR, 70-200 f/4 VR, the f/1.8 trinity (28, 50, 85) and the 105mm f/2.8 VR micro. I have found this array allows me to cover a wide range of subject matter and lighting conditions quite well. I also have a TC-17E which I have used with the 70-200 f/4 VR and the 105 f/2.8 micro with very good results. If Nikon updates the 300mm f/4 I will add that lens to my kit...and may add the new 24-85 VR as a general purpose walk-around lens. It is half the money of the 24-120 VR and DxOMark shows it to perform almost on par.
Location : Grimsby, ON, Canada
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 8 months ago
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Grimbot
8 months ago
Location : Grimsby, ON, Canada
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
answer 4
You already invest too many dollars on a camera to buy any lens, if you dont have lens for nikon, and you want a daily use lens, I'll go with the new 24-85mm VR F3.5-4.5, it will do the job and would give you a nice range for creativity, and the iso would help you on low ligth situations. From this point review what you want to do with your equipment to buy the next one.
Location : Monterrey International Airport (MTY), Carretera Miguel Aleman K.M 24, 66600 Apodaca, Nuevo León, Mexico
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 1 year, 7 months ago
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gpfoto
1 year, 7 months ago
Location : Monterrey International Airport (MTY), Carretera Miguel Aleman K.M 24, 66600 Apodaca, Nuevo León, Mexico
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+1point
3out of 5found this answer helpful.
answer 5
I've been using the 28-300 mm which I think is my best one. It costs around $1100, but shop around.
AL
Location : Dallas, TX
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
 
Products from my answer
 
answered 1 year, 7 months ago
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AL
1 year, 7 months ago
Location : Dallas, TX
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
+1point
3out of 5found this answer helpful.
answer 6
I'm assuming by saying "the best lens" for YOU (not necessarily for others) would be one walkaround lens you could use for 90% of your shooting needs - say a 24-70mm or 24-120mm zoom. For $1200 or less you have these options from Nikon, in order of preference for YOU:

Nikon 24-120mm f/4G ED VR. I think this would serve your needs best (but it's about $1300)
Nikon 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G ED VR (only about $600)
Nikon 28mm f/1.8G AF-S (about $700, if you really want a wide, prime lens less than $1200, but not as useful if this is your only lens)

If you are willing to go to a third-party lens, then you could consider these:

Tamron SP 24-70mm Di VC USD (about $1300, a little high but has "VC" - image stabilization)
Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 IF EX DG HSM (about $825 but no image stabilization)

Good luck and good shooting,
James
Location : Long Beach, CA, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than 10 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 1 year, 8 months ago
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James L
1 year, 8 months ago
Location : Long Beach, CA, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than 10 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+4points
4out of 4found this answer helpful.
answer 7
Sorry, but this is no way to go about choosing a lens!

Start by deciding exactly what you plan to photograph, and then research the lenses that are best suited to your needs. And please don't set an arbitrary limit on what you're planning to spend -- there are many options both more and less expensive than your quoted amount.

Most importantly, choose wisely. The D800 will maximize the qualities of whatever lens you mount on it -- if the qualities are poor, then your final product will suffer! Many people advise investing the greater amount in lenses over the camera body, and this is definitely something to consider very carefully!
Location : Richmond, VA USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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Hugo First
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : Richmond, VA USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
0points
3out of 6found this answer helpful.
answer 8
Please click on the link below for the lens simulator; it will help you to make the decision on what lens you need.
http://www.nikonusa.com/Nikon-Produ...
answered 2 years, 2 months ago
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NikonStaff
2 years, 2 months ago
-2points
5out of 12found this answer helpful.
Question

From the Technical Guide issued, due to the high resolution the camera must be held perfectly still or the image is blurred. True?

It's great to have a high resolution camera with many features, but if it's so sensitive that images are blurry with slight movement it can only be used on a stationary mount. In fact your technical guide says to use live view because that way the mirror isn't lifting during the picture which can cause blurring.
Location : New York, NY, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
asked 2 years, 1 month ago
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Groth
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : New York, NY, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
on D800
+6points
12out of 18found this question helpful.
7 answers
Answers
answer 1
I have had very good results with the D800 hand-held. If you use lenses such as the 16-35 f/4 VR or the 70-200 f/4 VR you should not have any problem shooting hand-held with the D800. I also have a D7000 and find it similar in terms of hand-held technique.

If you shoot with non-VR primes you may have to shoot a tad faster than you normally would with a D700 for example. For example, shooting birds in flight at 1/1000 to 1/1250 will yield excellent results.
Location : Grimsby, ON, Canada
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 8 months ago
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Grimbot
8 months ago
Location : Grimsby, ON, Canada
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
answer 2
I think you have to read Nikon's answer carefully. They save for "optimal" sharpness. I shoot medium format and if I want optimal sharpness I use a tripod. I have had the D800 for about 6 weeks and absolutely love the camera. There have been a couple of times where I had a shot that was blurry but the shots would have been blurry with any camera due to user error. The camera has a delayed exposure setting that when used with a tripod delivers the sharpest photos I have ever seen from any digital. I am primarily a Nikon guy but I do have a Canon 5D Mark II and my local camera store let me try the Canon 5D Mark III. The D800 was clearly sharper, which influenced my decision.
I really think the answer to your question though is dependent upon the type of photography you do. I shoot landscapes primarily and the D800 excells in this area of photography. I have found that for other types of photography that if I dial the image quality down to medium that I am still getting 20+ megapixels. I really like the versatility of the D800.
Bottom line is that if your technique is good you should not have any problems. If your technique is not good a little patience and practice you can improve your technique and have some awesome photos.
Good luck.
Location : Durham, NC
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 1 year, 10 months ago
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Thomas
1 year, 10 months ago
Location : Durham, NC
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+18points
19out of 20found this answer helpful.
answer 3
No worries.
The D800 has roughly the same pixel pitch as the D7000 and as far as blur is concerned it will behave similarly. As with ANY camera, the less motion there is during the exposure, the sharper it will be. Nikon's point is that in order to extract the greatest possible detail that the sensor is able to produce, a greater degree of care is required. If you take a photo with a D800 and shrink the image down to 16mp or 12mp or whatever, the amount of blur would be the same as if the image was taken with a lower resolution camera. If you are making 8 x 10 prints you don't need to treat the D800 any different than your current DSLR. If on the other hand you are printing at 40 x 60 inches, then a beefy weighted tripod, mirror up and a remote release will allow you to obtain the best images possible. Think of it this way, the amount of blur is no greater, but the sensor is capable of resolving it to a greater degree. Practically speaking, the added ability to resolve blur that is caused by camera motion needs to be addressed if you want to get the best results from large prints. The other place it might become noticeable is when cropping.... A 6mp image from a D70 might very well show less camera motion induced blur than a 6mp crop from a D800. However, if the D800 image is taken such that the 36mp D800 image has the same viewfinder coverage as the D70 image, the 36mp D800 will absolutely blow the D70 image away. In this case you might find some blur in details that cannot be resolved with the D70, and the elimination of THAT blur may require better technique. In summary, the D800 will not take pictures that have more blur than what you may be accustomed to, but it will allow you to resolve more detail; and that detail may have a component of blur.
Location : Napa, CA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 years ago
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Photogeek
2 years ago
Location : Napa, CA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
+26points
27out of 28found this answer helpful.
answer 4
Unfortunately the Nikon answer simply re-creates the uncertainty by seeming to say that blur will be amplified by this camera because of its high detail. It suggests that blur would not be as noticeable as with a camera of lower definition. So more care will have to be given, especially if you want to enlarge the image significantly.

As a fine point, you cannot expect the sharpest images with almost any camera at low to moderate shutter speeds without the use of a tripod or other steadying device and even mirror lock up.
Location : Portland, OR, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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Snappy
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : Portland, OR, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+1point
2out of 3found this answer helpful.
answer 5
Thanks. However, I didn't interpret the guide in the way you did. The example they showed employs that shutter speed, and logically it might make sense, but I get the feeling (from the NIkon team's answer as well) it is an issue with the camera and your technique has to be flawless. The biggest issue for me is this, followed by lower ISO than I expected. The camera's features otherwise seem fantastic. I have been a lifelong Canon user, and I was ready to switch, but obviously have some concerns.
Location : New York, NY, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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Groth
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : New York, NY, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
-15points
2out of 19found this answer helpful.
answer 6
If you look closely at the guide, the blur is only a possibility when shooting at shutter speeds of 1/15-1s. The Nikon D800 is just as hand-holdable as a D3, D700, D3S or any other DSLR.
Location : Denver, CO, USA
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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Nikonguy88
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : Denver, CO, USA
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+29points
30out of 31found this answer helpful.
answer 7
At the high resolutions offered by the D800/D800E, even the slightest camera motion can result in blur. The technique revealed in this section minimizes blur through a combination of live view photography and a tripod.
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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NikonStaff
2 years, 1 month ago
-20points
9out of 38found this answer helpful.
Question

With the D800E will moire occur with images in nature, or is it largely manifested with fine manmade structure.

I am a nature photographer (largely) and specifically I hope that moire will not occur on the wings of birds.
Location : Maine
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
asked 2 years, 2 months ago
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Robert
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : Maine
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
on D800
+9points
18out of 27found this question helpful.
6 answers
Answers
answer 1
Check out the fast Nikon lenses that Nikon recommends for the d800e try the 24mm f/1.4 super sharp.
answered 1 year, 2 months ago
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Anonymous
1 year, 2 months ago
+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
answer 2
The Nikon site has some good examples of moire in the D800E photographs. I initially ordered the D800E but subsequently switched to the D800 due to the problems with moire sans an AA filter. Yes, software can help in photographs but my understanding is that moire may be even more pronounced in videos and software will not touch that. I intend to use my D800 primarily for photographs but like the flexibility to also use it as a video camera. For most applications the clarity of detail will not be noticeable between the D800 and the D800E and the potential for considerable issues with moire with the D800E made the decision for me. We would all like to have everything but that is just not realistic in life.
Location : Portland, OR, USA
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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Beso
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : Portland, OR, USA
Age: 55-65
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
+5points
5out of 5found this answer helpful.
answer 3
Check out our Learn & Explore article that discusses the moire/false color issues and how to minimize them when using the D800E. http://www.nikonusa.com/Learn-And-E...
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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NikonStaff2
2 years, 1 month ago
+6points
6out of 6found this answer helpful.
answer 4
By and large Nikon is spot on in their evaluations of equipment. If you prefer to be out shooting and not at the computer adjusting images you should probably bypass the "E." I prefer shooting to tweaking images and have selected the D800 (waiting expectantly the arrival).

I'll shoot it for a few weeks before deciding which model for a second body. I prefer all bodies to be the identical when working. I'm old, the less confusion in life, the better. I'm betting that, unless you lean to huge enlargements, either model will suffice for your needs. That being the case, I'd select the less expensive model with a battery pack, fully expecting that 36.3MP will provide all the detail you'd want or need.

If you have a local Nikon dealer, rent or borrow both models and do an evaluation if you think the "low pass" might be a consideration.

50 years shooting wildlife mostly in Alaska, semi-professionally, using predominately Nikon bodies and lenses
Location : Alaska
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 2 years, 2 months ago
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Warren
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : Alaska
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+3points
3out of 3found this answer helpful.
answer 5
Download the model photo taken with the D800e camera and check out her fabric outfit; there is no moire patterns at all. Many 2 1/4 backs have no anti-aliasing filter and they get along just fine. Also, if you have a problem, you can add a CapRock AA filter on the lens, or remove the problem in software.
Location : Rochester, NY, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 years, 2 months ago
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F64photo
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : Rochester, NY, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
+7points
7out of 7found this answer helpful.
answer 6
I read fabrics, some bird feathers and architectural details will have very pronounced moire with D800e. Organic surfaces: faces, landscape and natural surfaces will have greater resolution(detail) when used with great glass($). IMHO D800e is special use(have multiple camera's), not for all around use. Heck 36MP will have massive detail and resolution to begin with.
Location : Tampa Bay, FL, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 years, 2 months ago
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Funduro
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : Tampa Bay, FL, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
+7points
7out of 7found this answer helpful.
Question

Is there an easy way to check number of the pictures taken by my D800?

I use camera for near one year and would like to know for how long I can use it. Is anybody know easy way count all data made by this camera, except using third party websites.

Thanks
Location : Watertown, MA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Professional photographer
asked 1 year ago
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Yevgen
1 year ago
Location : Watertown, MA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Professional photographer
on D800
+3points
3out of 3found this question helpful.
5 answers
Answers
answer 1
On Flickr the EXIF info will tell you this information as the image number which is about 13 from the bottom of the list.
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 months ago
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phototed
2 months ago
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
-1point
0out of 1found this answer helpful.
answer 2
Even Picasa should give you the shutter count in the Exif. It does with my D70S and D7100
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 3 months, 2 weeks ago
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Anonymous
3 months, 2 weeks ago
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
-1point
0out of 1found this answer helpful.
answer 3
Wow!!!!
It looks like "Anonymous" never made more than 9999 shorts by Nikon DSLR camera.
If he will made it, he will know that after 9999 the next short # will start from 0001.

welcome to Pro "Anonymous"
Location : Watertown, MA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer
answered 11 months ago
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Yevtitov
11 months ago
Location : Watertown, MA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Professional photographer
+1point
2out of 3found this answer helpful.
answer 4
It is easy. Just download your images to any PC. Your file name includes the number of pictures taken.
answered 11 months ago
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Anonymous
11 months ago
-2points
0out of 2found this answer helpful.
answer 5
No, you can only use 3rd party exif software or upload a photo to a shutter count website.
answered 1 year ago
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JoeR
1 year ago
+1point
2out of 3found this answer helpful.
Question

Does the Nikon d800/d800e have a auto function such as the Nikon d7000?

What I mean auto function, is the camera automatically adjusters the exposure, aperture, shutter speed, iso, etc.
Location : Canada
Age: Under 18
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
asked 2 years, 2 months ago
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The kid
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : Canada
Age: Under 18
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
on D800
0points
5out of 10found this question helpful.
4 answers
Answers
answer 1
P mode, along with auto ISO and auto focus, should be as good as any other Auto mode.
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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Anonymous
2 years, 1 month ago
+4points
4out of 4found this answer helpful.
answer 2
S, A, and P modes ARE automatic.

In S mode, you pick what shutter you want and the camera picks the aperture.

In A mode you pick the aperture, and the camera picks the shutter.

In P mode you don't have to pick anything. You can hand it to a friend and it will automatically adjust the aperture and shutter.

And if you put it in Auto ISO mode, it will adjust ISO automatically, as well.

The flash is never automatic with the D800. If you want flash you pop it up and it fires.
Location : Savannah, GA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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Arkayem
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : Savannah, GA, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer
+16points
16out of 16found this answer helpful.
answer 3
Why does nikon not put an auto function on these high end cameras? It is so hard to hand your camera to someone on vacation and tell them to point and shoot a shot of you if there is no true auto. very frustrating.
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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Anonymous
2 years, 1 month ago
-11points
1out of 13found this answer helpful.
answer 4
No auto modes, they are P,S,A and M only
answered 2 years, 2 months ago
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KeithD
2 years, 2 months ago
-7points
2out of 11found this answer helpful.
Question

Will the D800 be able to save user settings (like U1 and U2) like the D7000 can?

This is a tremendously useful feature for casual users who share this body, or for quick or emergency set-up or if the body is seldom used or hasn't been used for a while. Long a feature on Canon, it was well received on Nikon; the D7000 being one I have used. My older D700 sometimes could have used this feature.
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
asked 2 years, 2 months ago
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art743
2 years, 2 months ago
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
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on D800
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5out of 8found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
Yes it has these features; they are just inside the menus. It's not too difficult to change the user settings from C1 to C2 to C3 to C4 since you can tap the INFO button and select the Custom shooting blank.
Location : Virginia, USA
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 4 months, 2 weeks ago
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Nikon Enthusiast
4 months, 2 weeks ago
Location : Virginia, USA
Age: 18-24
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
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Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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0out of 0found this answer helpful.
answer 2
Since I do not have a camera like the D7000, I am not exactly sure what you are referring to with “U1” & “U2.” However, from what you are describing, I think it is what Nikon refers to as” Shooting Menu Banks.” The user’s manual for the D800 describes these on pages 269 and 270. They permit frequently used settings to be stored in Banks A, B, C, and D. Of course, you have to configure each Bank to your own desires.

(You can now download a “PDF” of the manual under the support section of this site.)
Location : Michigan, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 years ago
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BruceH
2 years ago
Location : Michigan, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
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0out of 0found this answer helpful.
answer 3
No U1/U2 settings
answered 2 years, 2 months ago
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JoeR
2 years, 2 months ago
+3points
4out of 5found this answer helpful.
Question

Can the D800 accomodate all Nikon Tilt Shift lenses?

The D700 flash housing interferes with the Nikkor 24 mm tilt shift lens. Will the D800 eliminate this interference or do I need a D4?
Location : West Linn, OR, USA
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
asked 2 years, 2 months ago
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Mr Specbus
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : West Linn, OR, USA
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
on D800
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0out of 0found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
Thanks for the feedback. I finally went to a dealer and tried the 24 mm tilt/shift on a D800. It works fine. I bought a D800E and a Nikkor 24mm tilt/shift. I have been using them happily together for several months.

Not sure what Nikon staff is thinking.
Location : West Linn, OR, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 1 year, 1 month ago
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MrSpecbus
1 year, 1 month ago
Location : West Linn, OR, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
answer 2
Actually, the answer from the Nikon staff is not quite correct. The D800 is capable of using the PCE lenses (commonly known as the Tilt Shift lenses). For the 24mm version there can be some contention of the PCE lens when being used in Portrait mode, but that is worked around very easily by rotating the lens in the opposite direction. Other than that one issue the PCE lenses from Nikon are fully compatible with the Nikon D800. Just do some research on the internet to see the number of people who blindly repeat the 'no' answer and then the few people who have actually used the PCE lenses with a D800. It is very workable and, with the great D800, it is WELL WORTH THE EFFORT.
Location : Hoffman Estates, IL, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 1 year, 1 month ago
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Jim B
1 year, 1 month ago
Location : Hoffman Estates, IL, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+3points
3out of 3found this answer helpful.
answer 3
Can not be used with shifting or tilting.
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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NikonStaff
2 years, 1 month ago
-7points
3out of 13found this answer helpful.
Question

Is the mc-dc2 remote really compatible with the D800s jacks?

It's listed as compatible on the system page, but I don't see it working with the USB3 jack. Wish the 800 supported infrared remotes like the D4. If anything, the 800 would seem to be even more tripod prone.
Location : Minneapolis, MN, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
asked 2 years, 2 months ago
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Curt G
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : Minneapolis, MN, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
on D800
-1point
1out of 3found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
I see Nikon has now removed the MC-dc2 from the compatible accessories list on this site. So I guess the answer is no, not compatible.
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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Curt G
2 years, 1 month ago
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0out of 0found this answer helpful.
answer 2
Joe,
Thanks for responding. I should have been more specific about IR. I meant internal receiver IR using the ML-L3. Less cumbersome, better performance in cold weather and if I lose the remote fob it's cheap to replace. Still wondering about corded options though.
Location : Minneapolis, MN, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 years, 2 months ago
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Curt G
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : Minneapolis, MN, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
answer 3
D800 works with optional ML-3 infrared LED remote
answered 2 years, 2 months ago
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JoeR
2 years, 2 months ago
+2points
2out of 2found this answer helpful.
Question

i have a Mac with usb 2.0 ports how do i use the usb 3.0 interface to import the photos and video?

Location : Bedford, OH, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
asked 2 years, 1 month ago
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Marvin
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : Bedford, OH, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Family & Friends
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
on D800
+4points
5out of 6found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
If you have an Express Slot, you can get a USB 3.0 adapter.

1 LAC 130976 LaCie 130976 USB 3.0 ExpressCard/34 Notebook Expansion Card
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 years ago
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Anonymous
2 years ago
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
-2points
0out of 2found this answer helpful.
answer 2
If you are concerned that you would not be able to interface with the USB 2.0, here's the answer from the Nikon D800 brochure:

"High-speed data transfer with USB 3.0

For a more productive tethered and transfer workflow, the
D800 is compatible with USB 3.0. When connected to
equipment featuring USB 2.0, speed is reduced to that of
USB 2.0."
Location : Michigan, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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BruceH
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : Michigan, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 21+ years
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Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
+7points
9out of 11found this answer helpful.
answer 3
Mac currently does not support usb 3.0 so you are out of luck, thunderbolt is the current high speed data transfer for mac's
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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KeithD
2 years, 1 month ago
-3points
4out of 11found this answer helpful.
Question

Image Quality in DX Mode vs D7000?

I own a D7000 and I was wondering if I should expect a noticeable or significant image quality difference with the D800? I shoot a lot of wildlife with a Sigma 150-500 and comparing the tech specs from the D7000/D800 in DX mode, I see that the pixel rating is slightly better with the D7000. I understand it isn't all about the pixels and has a lot to do with the sensor... Should I expect any noticeable improvement in sharpness/detail with D800 using the Sigma - all other things being equal? Thanks...
Location : Watertown, NY 13601, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
asked 2 years, 1 month ago
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Tbaker
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : Watertown, NY 13601, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
on D800
-1point
0out of 1found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
I own both the D800 and the D7000. In DX crop mode I have found that the D800 is noticeably better than the D7000. Images are slightly sharper, there is a bit more dynamic range and more discerning colour rendition....not a huge difference but noticeable, especially with larger size prints. I shoot birds with a Nikkor 70-200 f/4 VR with a TC-17E teleconverter. I did select specific lenses that score quite well on DxOMark testing with the D800. Other lenses may not provide good enough optics and may limit overall image quality.

I can't comment on the Sigma 150-500 as DxOMark has not tested that particular lens. The Sigma 120-400 does not score very well at all with either the D7000 or the D800. If the optics of your lens are not up to the challenge of the D800 you will likely not see any difference as your lens may be the weakest part of the system and there may not be any point in upgrading to the D800 if you have poor/average glass.
Location : Grimsby, ON, Canada
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 8 months ago
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Grimbot
8 months ago
Location : Grimsby, ON, Canada
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
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answer 2
If the Nikon answer to this question is correct in reference to quality being the same between the D7000 and D800 in crop mode, we are in a world of hurt. I own the D7000 and D700. I will not shoot pass ISO 400 on the D7000 for quality images for clients. On the D700, I can shoot up to ISO 1600 before I get concerned about the quality of images I give the client. Other Nikon staff states that the D800 image quality is on par with the D700. The Nikon response to this question states the D800 is on par with the D7000 in crop mode. Crop mode should only affect image resolution not quality.
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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Anonymous
2 years, 1 month ago
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0out of 0found this answer helpful.
answer 3
You can expect same quality between the D7000 and the D800 (full frame camera) in DX crop mode. Regarding the results using a third party product you will need to get in contact with them regarding sharpeness and details.
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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NikonStaff
2 years, 1 month ago
-3points
1out of 5found this answer helpful.
Question

Is there a definitive date for the D800 to be in the market..? I understand that due to the floods in Asia, there is a delay. ..?

Location : Hallandale, FL, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer
asked 2 years ago
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Photoleo
2 years ago
Location : Hallandale, FL, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Professional photographer
on D800
+2points
2out of 2found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
Hi Beso,

I have my name on local dealers wait lists, as well as have pre-ordered online. From calling dealers it is clear that they are getting limited numbers, but fulfilling them based on their wait lists, so that's why nobody ever has stock on hand, because the wait lists are "the longest they have ever seen." This clearly shows that Nikon is doing a poor job getting stock to dealers, but perhaps they are not accustomed to success on this level.

This information probably does not help you, but realize that there are many many people in the same position as you, and it will all work out eventually.

NIKON, please bump up your production to accomodate the demand for this product, as well as the D800E which is even more difficult to get!
Location : Portland, OR
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 2 years ago
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Goodbye Canon
2 years ago
Location : Portland, OR
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
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+2points
2out of 2found this answer helpful.
answer 2
Nikon's pat answer is they are shipping the cameras, check with you authorized dealer. Well, Nikon may be shipping them but no one seems to have them available; even for those of us who pre-ordered several months ago. Where do you think they are shipping them to? Certainly it does not appear they are being shipped to anywhere in the developed world.
Location : Portland, OR, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 years ago
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Beso
2 years ago
Location : Portland, OR, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
+4points
4out of 4found this answer helpful.
answer 3
We’re already shipping the D800. Please verify with dealers for availability.
answered 2 years ago
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NikonStaff
2 years ago
-37points
1out of 39found this answer helpful.
Question

For wedding D700 or D800?

D700 or D800 I think of plugging in low light and also the file size generated. should I change my computer?
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
asked 1 year, 10 months ago
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Anonymous
1 year, 10 months ago
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
on D800
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0out of 0found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
Among other reasons, I would choose D800 mostly because of cropping possibility - you can take 1/6th of the foto and still have 6mpx which will produce nice print. Of course, files are huge, but using PhotoMechanic will sort through your pictures much faster than any adobe products...and then you have only images you want to work with.
answered 7 months ago
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Anonymous
7 months ago
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0out of 0found this answer helpful.
answer 2
Hi
Both cameras perform excellent in low light.
Obviously the D800 is newest, largest file size ever for Nikon and the video capability.
Think over your needs, video? huge file size? probably some added RAM if not replacing computer...
Really these are two different cams with different features.
Both will astound in low light if thats your main concern...
Hope this helps...
Location : Sedona, AZ, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 1 year, 10 months ago
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NikonD
1 year, 10 months ago
Location : Sedona, AZ, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
answer 3
The right selection for a lens will depend a lot on the type of photography that you are interesting. Some photographers look for faster lenses (large aperture ex. f/2.8), wide angle, Telephoto, Macro or zoom lenses.
Please visit our website and use the lens finder tool in order for you to make your selection base on your needs.
http://www.nikonusa.com/Nikon-Produ...?
Please visit our Learn and Explore website for Photography Techniques:
http://www.nikonusa.com/Learn-And-E...
answered 1 year, 10 months ago
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NikonStaff
1 year, 10 months ago
-1point
0out of 1found this answer helpful.
Question

Currently, I've minimal experience with a D7000; will a D800 be too much too soon?

I can't see a problem transitioning from a D7000 to a D800, even though I have minimal experience with the D7000. It seems to me that if one knows/learns the operating terminology of the D800 setup procedure, there won’t be a problem configuring the D800. And, carrying that knowledge forward, there, likewise, won’t be a problem using the D800.

But, I present that speculation to the good judgment of you, the experts on this forum, to be supported if true or corrected if necessary. I understand that due to inexperience, I may be way off base here and that's why I'm asking.
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
asked 1 year, 3 months ago
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wild man
1 year, 3 months ago
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 0-1 years
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
on D800
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0out of 0found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
The basic question to ask yourself is why you need a full frame camera....and if you move up to the D800 you will need to be prepared to buy good quality FX lenses. There is no point at all in buying a D800 if you are only going to shoot in DX mode. Unless you plan on printing your images in large formats (24" x 36" for example) there is no point moving up from a DX body period. The D7000 is an excellent camera (I also own one) and will more than meet the needs of most casual photographers.Pair it with some decent Nikkor lenses (10-24, 16-85, 35 f/1.8, 70-300 VR, 85 micro VR) and you will have good all round capability.

You should be able to shoot the D7000 to ISO 800 without any problem....and up to 1250 will still produce reasonably clean images. With the D800 you will shoot about 2 stops more. The D600 is actually better for low light and when I had mine I regularly shot at ISO3200 without hesitation. Unfortunately I had 3 bad copies with oil on the sensor and I moved up the D800.

Unless you are planning on printing large size images save your money and don't buy the D800....invest in better quality lenses for your D7000.
Location : Grimsby, ON, Canada
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 8 months ago
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Grimbot
8 months ago
Location : Grimsby, ON, Canada
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
answer 2
You might also consider the D600, it has the feel and general setup of the D7000, with an FX sensor.
answered 1 year, 3 months ago
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JoeR
1 year, 3 months ago
-1point
0out of 1found this answer helpful.
answer 3
Only you can answer this question! The D7000 is a good camera, so I would wait until you feel like you feel that you are limited by the camera before upgrading. (Although when I think about it I’m not sure there is anything a D800 can do that a D7000 can’t)

By the way I'm a random person on the internet and have no association with Nikon.
answered 1 year, 3 months ago
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StuartM
1 year, 3 months ago
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0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Question

Is this camera worth the money

Seems pricey?
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
 
Products related to my question
 
 
 
asked 1 year, 1 month ago
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Anonymous
1 year, 1 month ago
Age: 25-34
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Occasional user, memory keeper
on D800
-1point
0out of 1found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
Yes, $2,700 - $3,000 is a lot of money for a camera. But this camera has the features and performance to justify that price.

If you compare it to it's closest competitor, the Canon 5D Mark III, the Nikon D800 is very reasonable. By comparison, the Canon model is overpriced at $3,300-$3,500, about $500 more than the D800. To me, in this class of camera, the D800 is clearly a better value.
Location : Long Beach, CA, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 1 year, 1 month ago
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Lundberg Photo
1 year, 1 month ago
Location : Long Beach, CA, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
answer 2
Well, it depends upon where you are in photography. If you are just starting out and not sure if photography is for you, then maybe not. But, if you want a great full frame camera which takes fantastic pictures then this camera will perform for you.

For me, it is worth every penny I paid for it.
Location : Hoffman Estates, IL, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 1 year, 1 month ago
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Jim B
1 year, 1 month ago
Location : Hoffman Estates, IL, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+1point
1out of 1found this answer helpful.
answer 3
Its worth the money if you have a need for it, Nikon are not exactly going to give it away are they.
answered 1 year, 1 month ago
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KeithD
1 year, 1 month ago
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0out of 0found this answer helpful.
Question

Formatting a new sd card

when putting in a new card the camera reads the card displaying the number of shots that can be taken but I went to the format card menu and the OK on the format bar was red and pressing nothing happened.
Does this mead the card was already formatted or am I doing something wrong?
Location : Franklinville, NC, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
asked 4 months, 2 weeks ago
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PhilT
4 months, 2 weeks ago
Location : Franklinville, NC, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
on D800
0points
0out of 0found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
i just got my 800 today and you must press the OK button, contrary to what another answer indicates. I just now formatted a new CF card.
Location : Huntsville, AL, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 3 months, 2 weeks ago
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Don
3 months, 2 weeks ago
Location : Huntsville, AL, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Experience: More than a year
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
0points
0out of 0found this answer helpful.
answer 2
That's what I did
answered 4 months, 2 weeks ago
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PhilT
4 months, 2 weeks ago
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0out of 0found this answer helpful.
answer 3
Don't push the OK button use the button in the center of the multi selector. Also, make sure you have the correct card slot selected.
answered 4 months, 2 weeks ago
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JoeR
4 months, 2 weeks ago
-1point
0out of 1found this answer helpful.
Question

I have read that some D800's have focus problems with the left side focus points. How can I test for this problem?

asked 1 year, 9 months ago
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Anonymous
1 year, 9 months ago
on D800
+3points
4out of 5found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
My right to left focus points work correctly but far left to right for the first few points are pathetic. The focus straightens out after about the fourth point left to right. Others seem to work OK but it would certainly benefit Nikon to contact the new owners and explain their position.
answered 1 year, 7 months ago
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Anonymous
1 year, 7 months ago
0points
1out of 2found this answer helpful.
answer 2
There are many reputable sources that have seen and documented this problem on some, but not all, D800 bodies. Please, Nikon, issue a press release or official statement on what causes this problem and how it is fixed. I really want to buy a D800 but $3000 (SRP, USA) is too much to risk with a chance of having a camera that has focus problems. I would really like an official definitive statement from Nikon about this issue. Until then I am on the sidelines. If it takes too long I may have to shop elsewhere.
Location : San Jose, CA, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 1 year, 8 months ago
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kidtire
1 year, 8 months ago
Location : San Jose, CA, USA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 1-3 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
+3points
3out of 3found this answer helpful.
answer 3
choose the left-most focus point and take a picture. when it turns out okay, you'll realize that not everything you read on the internet is accurate or true. my D800 was perfect right out of the box, and i've since added the new 28/1.8 lens, and i don't have focus issues, nor do i have to fine-tune my lenses or any of the other OCD behavior the chronic worriers and internet trolls go on and on about.
Location : Richmond, VA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 1 year, 9 months ago
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Hugo First
1 year, 9 months ago
Location : Richmond, VA
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 2-5 years
Experience: More than a year
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+5points
8out of 11found this answer helpful.
Question

Has Nikon fixed the left focus issues on the D 800? Ready to buy but don't want problems!!!

It appears that 20% have left focus issues
Location : Riverside, Ca
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
asked 1 year, 7 months ago
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Hpcon
1 year, 7 months ago
Location : Riverside, Ca
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
on D800
0points
0out of 0found this question helpful.
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
The left focus issue has been fixed for some time (months) for the cameras which are coming from the factory. The fix from the Nikon certified repair facilities are effective and will hold up as well as any camera coming from the factory due to how the fix is performed. This was a regrettable issue with some of the initial cameras coming from the factory, a quality control issue. But NIkon is a great company and they stand behind their products and support their users very well.
If you have not already, I would suggest that you go ahead and purchase your D800. If you are concerned about the focus issue there are several sites with instructions on how to test it to verify if you have an issue. I tested mine (purchases 6 months ago) and it does not have the left focus issue.
Location : Illinois, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 1 year, 3 months ago
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Jim B
1 year, 3 months ago
Location : Illinois, USA
Age: 55-65
Favorite Subject: Landscape
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Experience: 6-12 months
Role: Semi-professional photographer
+3points
3out of 3found this answer helpful.
answer 2
I doubt man. Nikon may fix it now and you will be happy. Then if it happen again you will land-up paying for shipping with insurance and service because warranty will be over by then......

I am an engineer and sincerely believe through my experience that once a product is opened then it is done and for sure you will have to open it again for same or other reason. One can not bring the same quality of workmanship when compared to factory quality be it CAMERA or CAR.

I have faulty piece and believe me and I know it feel you see your hard earned $3k burnt.
Location : Cupertino, CA, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 1 year, 5 months ago
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Zaango
1 year, 5 months ago
Location : Cupertino, CA, USA
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Nature
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Experience: 3-6 months
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
-3points
1out of 5found this answer helpful.
answer 3
Yes they are fixing all affected D800's ,they must be sent back for the repair.
answered 1 year, 7 months ago
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JoeR
1 year, 7 months ago
+1point
3out of 5found this answer helpful.
Question

What size are the RAW files produced for the various formats?

Location : Loveland, Oh
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
asked 2 years, 2 months ago
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Ric
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : Loveland, Oh
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
on D800
+4points
5out of 6found this question helpful.
2 answers
Answers
answer 1
The D800 "Prodcut Brochure" (see link above on this page) has a complete listing of file size projections
Location : Michigan, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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BruceH
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : Michigan, USA
Age: Over 65
Favorite Subject: Travel
Nikon Family: 21+ years
Role: Serious passion, hobbyist
-1point
2out of 5found this answer helpful.
answer 2
The RAW files are projected to be in the 70mb range.
Location : Brooklyn, NY
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
answered 2 years, 2 months ago
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itsbiggmac
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : Brooklyn, NY
Age: 35-44
Favorite Subject: Portrait
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
+15points
17out of 19found this answer helpful.
Question

Besides the crop modes, is there any possibility to shoot raw at less than the 36 megapixel size?

asked 2 years, 2 months ago
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Anonymous
2 years, 2 months ago
on D800
+4points
5out of 6found this question helpful.
2 answers
Answers
answer 1
I think the question is about is there any raw setting that let create raw an image with less than 36 Mpix. Example recording 18 Mpix by some algorithe who make average of some pixel...

It look like the answer is no. And a raw withouth all pixel will not be a raw. 70 Mo by raw will calm the index for some.

I guess if someone want less pixel in there raw they should probably shoot in medium (or small) tiff mode...
Location : Montreal, QC, Canada
Age: 35-44
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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Alex
2 years, 1 month ago
Location : Montreal, QC, Canada
Age: 35-44
Nikon Family: 6-10 years
Role: Semi-professional photographer
0points
1out of 2found this answer helpful.
answer 2
You can choose 3 types for RAW recording: Lossless compressed, Compressed, and Uncompressed.
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
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NikonStaff
2 years, 1 month ago
+7points
11out of 15found this answer helpful.
Question

How many shots can the D800 do during a burst?

Location : Caracas, Venezuela
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer
asked 2 years, 2 months ago
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sjpadron
2 years, 2 months ago
Location : Caracas, Venezuela
Age: 45-54
Favorite Subject: Sports
Nikon Family: 11-20 years
Experience: Less than a month
Role: Semi-professional photographer
on D800
+4points
7out of 10found this question helpful.
2 answers
Answers
answer 1
Here's a quote from a CameraLabs article on the Nikon D800:

"In terms of the buffer, Nikon quotes 16, 17 or 20 uncompressed, lossless or compressed RAW files respectively in the 36 Megapixel / 14 bit mode. JPEG shooters can capture up to 56 Large Fine 36 Megapixel JPEGs in a burst, and if you're willing to increase the compression or reduce the resolution, you can increase this to 100 frames."
answered 2 years, 2 months ago
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David
2 years, 2 months ago
+12points
12out of 12found this answer helpful.
answer 2
Shutter Release Modes
Continuous low-speed [CL] mode; 1-4 frames per second
Continuous high-speed [CH] mode; 4 frames per second
Mirror-up [Mup] mode
Quiet Shutter Release
Self-timer mode
Single-frame [S] mode Continuous Shooting Options FX-format
CH: Up to 4 frames per second
CL: Up to 4 frames per second
5:4 format
CH: Up to 4 frames per second
CL: Up to 4 frames per second
DX-format
CH: Up to 5 frames per second
CL: Up to 5 frames per second
1:2 format
CH: Up to 5 frames per second
CL: Up to 5 frames per second
Top Continuous Shooting Speed at full resolution 4 frames per second
answered 2 years, 2 months ago
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NikonStaff
2 years, 2 months ago
-29points
4out of 37found this answer helpful.
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